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104 Psychoanalytic Technique Part II – 5 seminars

Seminar Leaders: Drs. Claire Lunney and Daniel Traub-Werner

Course Description

The Introduction to Psychoanalytic Technique will teach basic concepts in psychoanalytic technique and their application to the psychoanalytic process: the analytic situation, the patient’s remembered history and unconscious past, the structure and objectives of the psychoanalytic interview, the initial stage (or opening phase) of a psychoanalytic process, the analysis of defence and resistance, the meanings and use of the counter-transference, the transference neurosis and the active technique, construction, the dynamics and economics of Interpretation, the structural aspects of interpretation, the nature of therapeutic action, and the concept of the total situation in the psychoanalytic process.

Course Objectives

Candidates will be able to:

  1. Conduct an effective psychoanalytic interview to facilitate the beginning of an analytic process and to make an assessment of suitability for analysis. (1.4)
  2. Have knowledge of key technical concepts and their application: the meanings and use of the counter-transference, learning how to undertake critical self-reflection, to integrate knowledge of the impact of the therapist’s self on the therapeutic process (1.4), and to use the impact of the patient’s provocations to digest their meaning and interpret core dynamics, and to demonstrate awareness of the impact of the therapist’s subjective context on the therapeutic process (4.3).
  3. Integrate a theory of change consistent with the established theoretical orientation (1.2), concerning the efficacy of the interpretation of the fears of the patients in the therapeutic relationship, and of adjusting therapeutic interpretations in the light of the dynamics and economics of interpretation. (1.4)
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of a theory of change: the facilitation of both the patient’s remembered history and access to the unconscious past, in a way that allows for the patient to have access to and to regulate a wider range of emotions. (1.4)
  5. Use the knowledge of resistance and defense to establish and maintain a therapeutic relationship and to effect change. (1.4)

Seminar 1

The Frame, the Psychoanalytic Interview and the Opening Phase

At the end of this seminar, candidates should be able to differentiate the role of the psychoanalyst in relation to other mental health professionals; explain the responsibilities of the patient and the psychoanalyst in the psychoanalytic psychotherapeutic relationship. The candidate should be able to further explain the advantages and disadvantages of participating in a psychoanalytic psychotherapy. The candidate should be able to communicate patient rights to privacy and confidentiality, and the limitations imposed upon it by law; explain relevant rules and policies; respond to patient questions and explain and obtain informed consent in accordance with legal requirements.

Required Readings

Glover, E. (1974). “Chapter I: Preamble to analysis. The analyst: The analytic situation” (pp. 3–17); “Chapters II and III: The opening phase” (pp. 18–49). In The Technique of Psychoanalysis. New York, NY: International Universities Press.

Aguayo, J. (2011). The role of the patient’s remembered history and unconscious past in the evolution of Betty Joseph’s ‘Here and now’ clinical technique. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 92, 1117-1136.

Etchegoyen, R.H. (1999). “The psychoanalytic interview: structure and objectives” (pp. 41-49); “The psychoanalytic interview: development” (pp. 50–59); “The psychoanalytic contract “ (pp. 60-67); “The initial stage” (pp. 605–613). In The Fundamentals of Psychoanalytic Technique.  London: Karnac Books.

Seminar 2

Structure and Facilitation of the Psychoanalytic Process

At the end of this seminar, candidates should be able to communicate in a manner appropriate to patient’s developmental level and socio-cultural identity. Furthermore, candidates should be able to identify and respond appropriately to patient’s strengths, vulnerabilities, resilience and resources and develop individualized goals and objectives with the patient and formulate a direction for treatment. The study of Resistance should facilitate the use of a variety of helping strategies, timely interventions, and the recognition of the significance of action and inaction and the identification of contextual influences.

Required Readings

Glover, E. (1974). Chapters IV and V: Defence-resistance. In The Technique of Psychoanalysis (pp. 50– 87). New York, NY: International Universities Press.

Bollas, C. (2015). Psychoanalysis in the age of bewilderment: On the return of the oppressed. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 96, 535–551.

Greenson, R. (1976). The Technique and Practice of Psychoanalysis (Volume 1). “Chapter 2: Resistance”; “Classification of resistances” (pp. 85– 96); “Technique of analyzing resistance” (pp. 96–136); “Rules of technique concerning resistance” (pp. 136–150). New York, NY: International Universities Press.

Seminar 3

Identification and Therapeutic use of Counter-Transference and Counter- Resistance

At the end of this seminar, candidates should be able to respond non-reactively to anger, hostility and criticism from the patient; respond professionally to expressions of inappropriate attachment from the patient; and respond appropriately to the expression of intense emotions and help the patient to understand and manage intense emotions.

Required Readings

Glover, E. (1974). Chapter VI: Counter-transference and counter-resistance. In The Technique of Psychoanalysis (pp. 88-107). New York, NY: International Universities Press.

Racker, H. (1968). Chapter 6: The meanings and uses of counter-transference. In Transference and Counter-Transference (pp. 127-173). Madison, CT: International Universities Press.

Blum, H. (2011). Reflections on the past as prologue. Journal of American Psychoanalytic Association, 58,11-26.

Seminar 4

The Transference Neurosis: Safe and Effective Use of Self in the Therapeutic Relationship

At the end of this seminar, candidates should be able to formulate a direction for treatment; facilitate the patient’s exploration of issues and patterns of behaviour; support the patient to explore a range of emotions; employ a variety of helping strategies and ensure timeliness of interventions.

Required Readings

Glover, E. (1974). “Chapters VII and VIII: The transference-neurosis” (pp. 108–137); “Chapter XI: Active technique” (pp. 165-184). In The Technique of Psychoanalysis. New York, NY: International Universities Press.

Green, A. (2012). On construction in Freud’s work. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 93 (5), 1238-1248.

Fenichel, O. (1941). “Chapter III: The first analytical steps – dynamics and economics of interpretation” (pp. 23–53); “Chapter IV: Structural aspects of interpretation” (pp. 54-70). In Problems of Psychoanalytic Technique. N.Y.: The Psychoanalytic Quarterly.

Seminar 5

Therapeutic Action, the Total Situation and Winnicott’s innovations

At the end of this seminar, candidates should be able to demonstrate the following skills: the use of empathy, respect, and authenticity; establish rapport; demonstrate awareness of the impact of the patient’s context on the therapeutic process; demonstrate sensitivity to the setting in which therapy takes place; assume a non-judgmental stance; explain theoretical concepts in terms the patient can understand; foster patient autonomy; maintain appropriate therapeutic boundaries; define clear boundaries of response to the patient’s requests or demands; take all reasonable measures to safeguard physical and emotional safety of the patient during clinical work; employ effective skills in observation of self, the patient and the therapeutic process and demonstrate dependability.

Required Readings

Heimann, P. (1950). On counter-transference. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 31, 81- 84.

Strachey, J. (1969). The nature of the therapeutic action of psychoanalysis. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 50, 275-292.

Joseph, B. (1985). Transference: The total situation. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 66, 447-454.

Abram, J. (2012). On Winnicott’s clinical innovations in the analysis of adults. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 66, 1461–1473.

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