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TIP Curriculum

First Year

101 On Becoming a Psychoanalyst: IPA Ethics and Analytic Attitude

In this introduction seminar, “On Becoming and Being a Psychoanalyst”, we will explore and clarify IPA Ethics Principles, Professional Self Image, and the Emotional Stress of doing psychoanalytic work. This discussion group gives the candidates an opportunity to reflect actively on their paths to psychoanalysis, and their futures as psychoanalysts…

101 Full Description and Readings

102 Origins of Psychoanalysis: Core Concepts (1896-1901)

This course, in ten seminars, explores Freud’s discovery of the psychic unconscious and psychoanalysis as a theory of human nature and a clinical method for the treatment of psychopathology including: a new psychological theory of the origins of hysterical and obsessional symptoms and their treatment with free association psychotherapy…

102 Full Description and Readings

103 Introduction to Psychoanalytic Technique Part I

Through a study of Freud’s classic papers on technique, and some later papers, we will understand the origins of the psychoanalytic theory of psychotherapeutic technique, a basic technique which was the first talking cure, and the basis, at least in some of its elements, for all later forms of psychotherapy. We will look at the origins of these ideas, and at later, modern, discussions of them…

103 Full Description and Readings

104 Psychoanalytic Technique Part II

The Introduction to Psychoanalytic Technique will teach basic concepts in psychoanalytic technique and their application to the psychoanalytic process: the analytic situation, the patient’s remembered history and unconscious past, the structure and objectives of the psychoanalytic interview, the initial stage (or opening phase) of a psychoanalytic process, the analysis of defence and resistance, the meanings and use of the counter-transference, the transference neurosis and the active technique…

104 Full Description and Readings

105 Assessment of Pathologies Part I and Part II

These four seminars will enable candidates to diagnose and assess patients for psychoanalytic treatment as well as their suitability as control cases. Candidates will learn to differentiate psychosis, neurosis and border-line conditions with focus on the main neurotic conditions (hysteria, obsessions, perversions, character disorders, narcissistic disorders) including severity and combinations. Attention will also be given to post-traumatic disorders…

105 Full Description and Readings

106 Core Structural and Dynamic Concepts

This course is an introduction to a crucial group of psychoanalytic theories at the core of clinical practise. It builds on the topographical model of The Interpretation of Dreams, trauma and the libidinal and unconscious phantasy factors in neurosis, and early clinical theory of Course 102. This course will focus on Freud’s theory of libido, psychosexual development, instinctual vicissitudes, pathology and health, integrations and potentials for conflict…

106 Full Description and Readings

107 Classics of Formulation

This course, in ten seminars, explores Freud’s discovery of the psychic unconscious and psychoanalysis as a theory of human nature as it reveals itself in the case studies which serve as the foundation for all later formulations of the clinical conditions and diagnoses for which psychoanalysis has proven to be the essential treatment modality…

107 Full Description and Readings

108 Comparative Psychotherapies

This 3-hour course will cover ten major psychotherapies (including CBT, DBT, IPT, Integrative Psychotherapy, Mindfulness, Supportive vs. Expressive Psychotherapy, EMDR, Family and Marital Psychotherapy, Group Psychotherapy, Expressive Psychotherapies). The candidates will understand what these methods are, how they claim to work, and for which patients they are appropriate, and whether we combine aspects of them with psychoanalytic treatment…

108 Full Description and Readings

109 Understanding DSM 5 and Psychiatric Medications

The goal of this 3-hour seminar is to help Candidates become familiar with the major classes of psychiatric conditions along with the medications to treat them. Candidates will learn about core interviewing techniques which will help them identify the main psychiatric conditions, including having an approach to dealing with psychiatric emergencies that may present during the assessment. In addition, Candidates will learn how different psychiatric conditions may impact the patient’s response to psychoanalytic techniques…

109 Full Description and Readings

110 Core Concepts: Conflict and Compromise Formation

This course, in 4 seminars, focuses on conflict theory as it has evolved from Freud’s original formulations involving his structural/dynamic theories at a neurotic level of functioning to the present usage/understanding involving all levels of intrapsychic formation both conscious and unconscious. Although initially conceptualized for neurotic/structural/Oedipal conflict, the current thinking/practice is to apply conflict within an object-relational /pre-Oedipal context as well…

110 Full Description and Readings

111 Core Concepts: Masochism, Perversion, Impasse and Technique

These three seminars deal with papers which trace an overview across much of the working analytic life-span of psychoanalysis’ founder Sigmund Freud. A Child is Being Beaten, Fetishism and Analysis Terminable and Interminable are three seminal works the study of which will enable candidates to gain an overview of the relation between theory and clinical practise in relation to masochism, sexual anxiety, libidinal regressions and fixations and the limits of psychoanalytic therapy…

111 Full Description and Readings

112 Freud’s Sociological Theories

These two seminars seek to survey and explore a few avenues of critique of Freud’s theories of religion and civilization. Candidates will read Future of an Illusion (1927) and Civilization and Its Discontents (1930). (Freud’s work on group psychology is not covered here)…

112 Full Description and Readings

113 Ethics

These two Seminars comprise the first section of an Ethics Course, which is taught over the four years of the Curriculum. The seminars explore the importance of establishing the treatment frame, appropriate boundaries, and analytic neutrality, for the therapeutic relationship. Boundary configurations with different types of patients are described. The Course demonstrates the essential role of confidentiality in facilitating trust and growth in the therapeutic relationship. The Course Readings show the role of boundaries in maintaining a non-judgmental stance…

113 Full Description and Readings

114 Group Supervision/Technique #1

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates, from the outset of their analytic training, exposure to clinical thinking and process, as well as ongoing participation in discussion about their own and their colleagues’ developing practices and skill acquisition. This is an important foundation and stimulus for the ability to sensitively and confidently enable patients to enter into and profit from psychodynamic therapy, with the goal of nurturing the unfolding therapeutic relationship, and increasing patients’ receptivity…

114 Full Description and Readings

115 Psychoanalysis, Culture, Diversity, Power Dynamics

This course examines the intersection between anti-oppressive practice and psychoanalysis. We will examine how internalized cultural/social biases can obstruct the appropriate use of self to effectively contribute to the development of a solid therapeutic alliance when working psychoanalytically with persons who are members of groups who have experienced oppression resulting from their demographic differences (race, ethnicity, gender, social class, sexual identity, sexual orientation, ability and disability among others)…

115 Full Description and Readings

116 From Freud to Klein

This course introduces candidates to the psychoanalytic work of Melanie Klein. It traces both her continuity with and key departures from Freudian theory, such as her rejection of the concept of primary narcissism, her insistence on the existence of object relations from the beginning and the importance of the early mother-infant relation (in which mother is initially experienced as a part-object, good or bad). Her elaboration of the theory of the paranoid-schizoid and depressive positions…

116 Full Description and Readings

117 Psychoanalysis and Neuropsychoanalysis

In these two seminars we will begin with the Project for a Scientific Psychology, Freud’s historic attempt to sketch out a neurological substrate that might underlie his developing appreciation of phenomena encountered in his clinical experience. Many writers have pointed out the continuing thread of this effort throughout his writings and beyond. Today, psychoanalytic theory and method are challenged by alternative approaches, many of which claim a basis in neuroscientific findings…

117 Full Description and Readings

 


Second Year

201 Technique: Dream Interpretation

This 5 seminar course addresses the evolution of psychoanalytic dream theory and practice after Freud’s “The Interpretation of Dreams”. Seminar 1 reinforces the central technique of free association in working with dreams (and generally) in psychoanalytic treatment. Seminar 2 explores the uniquely catalytic role of dreams in facilitating work with developmental issues and their recapitulation within the treatment…

201 Full Description and Readings

202 Technique: The Psychoanalytic Process

This set of five seminars will teach concepts of technique and their application in a psychoanalytic process: the frame, initiating the analytic process, assessing and formulating the case, and considering strategies with more difficult patients and for termination. The candidates will be taught to apply important concepts such as the analytic attitude, initiating the analytic process, transference…

202 Full Description and Readings

203 Theories of Development I: Infancy and Early Child Development

This course, in 4 sessions, explores the importance of understanding infancy and infant development. Psychoanalysis today has an array of theoretical and therapeutic approaches. These schools of thought are receptive to interactive and relational concepts, which begin within the first year of life. These recent developments in thinking include the analyst’s subjectivity as an instrument of investigation through the concept of countertransference…

203 Full Description and Readings

204 Theories of Development II Oedipal Development

This course introduces candidates to oedipal stage development. It also covers some of the necessary preceding developmental processes. The Course teaches what is meant by object constancy and how to understand the way in which it is related to oedipal stage development. The Course teaches candidates to distinguish between phallic-narcissistic and phallic-oedipal stages of development and to understand differences between…

204 Full Description and Readings

205 Theories of Development III Latency

The Course teaches the stages in the Latency phase of development and applications of the theory to treatment. The concepts central to understanding Latency are clarified: attachment and autonomy, the play theory and metaphors of the body, specifics of the setting for psychoanalysis of a latency child, sexual differentiation, pre-oedipal transference transformations…

205 Full Description and Readings

206 Theories of Development IV Adolescence

This course in 3 seminars teaches candidates to understand adolescent development and its importance and relevance to adult psychoanalytic practice. The seminar explores and contrasts different psychoanalytic theoretical models to understand this development. How adolescents change over time and the factors that influence that change are also explored…

206 Full Description and Readings

207 Clinical Concepts and Theoretical Developments I Ego Psychology

The psychoanalytic term “ego psychology” refers to the understanding of the ego’s structures and of its interaction with the drives and with reality, and to the major theorists (such as Heinz Hartmann and Anna Freud) who wrote on these subjects. Despite their difficulty, the works of Heinz Hartmann and Ernst Kris (two foundational theorists) have clinical relevance to assessment, to interventions, and to an understanding of the nature of the analytic process…

207 Full Description and Readings

208 CRPO Professional Practice Standards and Jurisprudence Overview and Review

This 3-hour seminar will familiarize trainees with the CRPO Professional Practice Standards and Jurisprudence for Registered Psychotherapists. Trainees will be introduced to the role of the College of Psychotherapy and will review the CRPO code of Ethics and professional standards, including professional misconduct, incompetence and incapacity. Students will also be required to review client-therapist relationships…

208 Full Description and Readings

209 Ethics II

The second section of the Ethics Course explores boundary concepts specific to psychoanalytic work, and optimal assessment of risks. Non-sexual boundary violations, in such areas as receiving gifts, money exchange and therapist self-revelation are considered, as well as misuses of boundary theory to explain problematic clinical outcomes. Boundaries are also considered in terms of their role…

209 Full Description and Readings

210 Clinical Concepts and Theoretical Developments I Ego Psychology/Superego

The goal of this course is to introduce clinicians to the very rich contributions psychoanalytic theory and practice have made to understanding the development and functioning of conscience in individual psychology and in society. Prior to Freud’s insights which were based on his vast clinical work, knowledge about conscience and morality came from philosophy, religion, history and literature…

210 Full Description and Readings

211 Clinical Concepts and Theoretical Developments II British Object Relations

This course is a ten-session introduction to some of the main British Object Relations theories, which began as two divergent schools of thought, the Independent or Middle Group and the Kleinians. There will be two seminars on Fairbairn, two seminars on Winnicott, four seminars on Klein, and two seminars on Bion. In all the seminars, we will trace the evolution and refinements that have led up to the current models of theory and practice…

211 Full Description and Readings

212 Group Supervision/Technique #2

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates, from the outset of their analytic training and throughout, exposure to clinical thinking and process, as well as ongoing participation in discussions about their own and their colleagues’ developing practices and skill acquisition. This is an important foundation and stimulus for the ability to sensitively and confidently enable patients to enter into and profit from psychoanalytic therapy…

212 Full Description and Readings

213 Clinical Concepts and Theoretical Developments III American Object Relations

This course of 10 seminars will teach candidates further developments in core clinical Object Relations’ concepts and theories, first elaborated in England and then in the US. New clinical approaches were developed by Sandler and others in England, and by Jacobson, Mahler, Kernberg in America. These elaborations of Object Relations theory differ substantially from the Object Relations theories of Kleinians and of the Middle Group in England…

213 Full Description and Readings

214 Group Supervision/Technique #3

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates, from the outset of their analytic training and throughout, exposure to clinical thinking and process, as well as ongoing participation in discussions about their own and their colleagues’ developing practices and skill acquisition. This is an important foundation and stimulus for the ability to sensitively and confidently enable patients to enter into and profit from psychoanalytic therapy…

214 Full Description and Readings

 


Third Year

301 Self Psychology

This seminar series focuses on the key concepts of self psychology initially derived from Heinz Kohut, focusing on 1) the relationship between mode of observation to theory; 2) the centrality of introspection and empathy in psychoanalysis; and 3) the presence of the self-object function which in Kohut’s theory are essential factors in therapeutic change. The core theoretical approach in self psychology utilizes this observational method through introspection…

301 Full Description and Readings

302 Group Supervision/Technique # 4

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates, from the outset of their analytic training, exposure to clinical thinking and process, as well as ongoing participation in discussion about their own and their colleagues’ developing practices and skill acquisition. This is an important foundation and stimulus for the ability to sensitively and confidently enable patients to enter into and profit from psychodynamic therapy, with the goal of nurturing the unfolding therapeutic relationship…

302 Full Description and Readings

304 Comparative Dreams

The focus of the Third Year Comparative Dream Course, comprised of five seminars, is to facilitate discussion and self-reflection about the present-day complexity of psychoanalytically informed thinking about dreams. The required readings selected are from the perspective of three exemplars of the diverse approaches to dreams that have developed since Freud’s work, The Interpretation of Dreams. They are meant to stimulate and deepen candidates’ thinking…

304 Full Description and Readings

305 Bion

These five seminars expand on the theoretical and clinical concepts of Wilfred Bion introduced in year Two. These seminars provide an outline of some of Bion’s main theoretical and clinical concepts both as extensions and modifications of Freud’s and Klein’s ideas. This course will compare and contrast the respective group psychologies developed by Freud (1921) and Bion (1959) and survey the development of Bion’s thought especially its relevance for clinical work…

305 Full Description and Readings

306 Boundaries and Ethics

In these two seminars, we explore aspects of sexual boundaries and their modes of violation in treatment situations. Typologies of boundary violators are considered, to increase awareness of both the situations therapists can fall into, and the work that they can do to prevent these from occurring. Some analysts do not well understand the nature of transference in the area of ongoing boundary concerns. Therefore, a section considers post-termination boundaries…

306 Full Description and Readings

307 Character

Character is a concept that permeates every aspect of psychoanalytic work, whether in the foreground or the background. While difficult to define, its properties and organization exert their influence in all aspects of an individual’s life, and throughout the analytic treatment process. This is the case, whether character is at the centre of the analyst’s focus on the work with the patient, or if it constitutes the backdrop – acknowledged, or unaddressed…

307 Full Description and Readings

308 Perverse Formations

This course will address perversion as a significant psychological structure distinct from neurosis and psychosis. Further, candidates will develop an understanding of perversion from Freud to the modern day with an emphasis on the clinical setting and psychoanalytic technique through a review of the literature with illustrations drawn from case examples and select movies. A broad supplementary reading list will encourage further directions to pursue…

308 Full Description and Readings

309 Group Supervision/Technique # 5

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates, from the outset of their analytic training, exposure to clinical thinking and process, as well as ongoing participation in discussion about their own and their colleagues’ developing practices and skill acquisition. This is an important foundation and stimulus for the ability to sensitively and confidently enable patients to enter into and profit from psychodynamic therapy, with the goal of nurturing the unfolding therapeutic relationship…

309 Full Description and Readings

310 Character Assessment

This course, in 4 seminars, explores different aspects of character assessment using developmental theory, countertransference responses in the assessment and varying presentations of character. The seminar will use clinical material and discussion to explore character assessment and will develop the clinical knowledge and assessment techniques of training psychoanalysts…

310 Full Description and Readings

311 Comparative Transference and Counter-transference

This course will explore different psychoanalytic views on the nature and uses of the transference and countertransference. We will look at classical, object relations and Kleinian views on the nature of transference and countertransference, comparing and contrasting their theoretical views on the dynamics of these central psychoanalytic phenomena, on the uses to which they can be put in therapy…

311 Full Description and Readings

312 Gender and Sexuality

The seminars will focus on the multiple facets of historical and modern psychoanalytic theory with an eye toward clinical practice. Matters such as gender embodiment, gender variation, gender regulation and perversion will be addressed. Gendered experience and identity will be viewed through a complex and nonlinear lens focusing on sexual subjectivity in the analytic dyad and psychic life…

312 Full Description and Readings

313 Research in Psychoanalysis

This four-session program begins with presenting two sides of a debate about the importance of empirical research for psychoanalysis—how crucial is it to its future, and what are its limits? Since many of the studies that support the value of psychoanalysis are studies of psychoanalytic psychotherapy, we then read two recent reviews of studies that address the questions of whether this kind of therapy works and for whom. This is followed by in-depth study of three important myth-busting papers…

313 Full Description and Readings

314 Trauma

The purpose of these five seminars is to understand the historical underpinnings of the psychoanalytic approach to trauma and to integrate this knowledge of trauma on psychological functioning. Candidates will appreciate the neurobiological contribution towards a psychoanalytic model of treatment; understand Trauma and the Zero Process and the psychoanalytic treatment of dissociation; and learn to recognize the transference/counter-transference enactments that occur through trauma…

314 Full Description and Readings

 


Fourth Year

401 Contemporary Kleinian Theory

This series of five seminars will provide an introduction to modern Kleinian /Bionian theory as an alternative to the Freudian drive/defense model. The seminar on the modern Kleinian view of the clinical manifestations of the Oedipus Complex and its technical challenges will allow for a direct comparison of Freudian and modern Kleinian theory. Furthermore we will discuss two principal modes of relatedness…

401 Full Description and Readings

402 French Freudians: Integrating Kleinian Thought

This Course will teach candidates how to formulate a direction for therapy with several pathologies, but especially with patients suffering from significant object loss. The Course will focus on psychoanalytic theories which demonstrate how to apply the concepts of “primal scene”, “narcissistic economy and primitive sexuality”, “melancholia”, “maternal depression”, “separation anxiety” elaborated by French Freudians, using the theories of Klein and Bion…

402 Full Description and Readings

403 Modern Ego Psychology

In this series of seminars, we will divide our time each week between a consideration of the Ego Psychological approach to technique and a paper by a modern Ego Psychologist about an area of modern life. In the first seminar we consider general approaches to technique. We then consider questions of how to help the patient learn to notice and be curious about bodily symptoms, dreams, habitual patterns of relationship, and habitual and automatic avoidances…

403 Full Description and Readings

404 Group Supervision/Technique #6

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates, from the outset of their analytic training, exposure to clinical thinking and process, as well as ongoing participation in discussion about their own and their colleagues’ developing practices and skill acquisition. This is an important foundation and stimulus for the ability to sensitively and confidently enable patients to enter into and profit from psychodynamic therapy, with the goal of nurturing the unfolding therapeutic relationship…

404 Full Description and Readings

405 Masochism

This course will teach candidates to define and describe the many-faceted concept of masochism, so that they can identify, recognize, assess, and formulate masochistic character, and can identify sadomasochistic transferences and dynamics so as to effect change. Clinical material will be presented to facilitate the application of theory and concepts to the psychoanalytic therapeutic process. Developmental challenges and trauma can lead to excessive masochistic defenses…

405 Full Description and Readings

406 Lacan

During this series of five seminars, we will try to get a grasp of Lacan’s style and purpose by reading the first few sections of the first chapter of Lacan’s Seminar 1 over the five weeks, reading only a couple of pages each week. Lacan’s Seminar 1 is a commentary on Freud’s papers on technique, which we studied in first year. A quick review of these papers would be helpful before we start. We will experience and discuss Lacan’s particular famous or infamous style and follow the curiosity…

406 Full Description and Readings

407 Group Supervision/ Comparative Technique #7

The purpose of this course is to provide candidates, from the outset of their analytic training, exposure to clinical thinking and process, as well as ongoing participation in discussion about their own and their colleagues’ developing practices and skill acquisition. This is an important foundation and stimulus for the ability to sensitively and confidently enable patients to enter into and profit from psychodynamic therapy, with the goal of nurturing the unfolding therapeutic relationship…

407 Full Description and Readings

408 Termination

This course on termination covers the following areas: (a) seminar 1 focuses on termination from an historical perspective: Freud’s 1937 work on “Analysis Terminable and Interminable” is reviewed and Balint, Buxbaum, Klein and Reich articles from the 1950s are considered in the light of the development of Freud’s ideas about termination; (b) seminar 2 considers current views on ending an analysis and issues which arise at termination…

408 Full Description and Readings

409 Dreams: Theories and Practices

This 5-seminar course will illustrate a diversity of clinical psychoanalytic practices in working with dreams through the examination of verbatim session material. Candidates will also present dreams from case material. Divergence between theory and actual practice will be explored in the hopes of fostering an attitude of flexibility in the candidates’ work with dreams. A shift will also be evident across decades of actual psychoanalytic practices with dreams…

409 Full Description and Readings

410 Report Writing/Case Formulation

The Course will select a Candidate’s case reports written at the beginning and at a later point in a psychoanalytic process, to show candidates how to use session material as evidence for coherent formulations, interpretations, and observations of change and absence of change in the patient. Candidates will read chapters from Time for Change: Tracking Transformations in Psychoanalysis to see examples of clinical reports, which use three levels of observation…

410 Full Description and Readings

411 Ethics

In these two seminars, we explore aspects of sexual boundary violators, and whether being seen as a “lost cause”, can be a way to deny more common vulnerability to transgression. Also considered are the institutional responses to boundary violations by prominent analysts, and the impact this can have on our organizations. In the second seminar, we delve further into the possible constructive roles of ethics committees, codes of ethics, and the historical changes in this area…

411 Full Description and Readings

412 Winnicott

These two seminars will expand on the introductory seminars from Year 2, with a more detailed discussion of some of Winnicott’s basic concepts. We will include more recent interpretations that integrate these ideas with current psychoanalytic theories and techniques…

412 Full Description and Readings

413 Illness in the Therapist or the Analyst

This seminar explores the complexities of when the therapist or analyst becomes ill and the impact that this has on one’s patients in the context of the safe and effective use of self. It also enumerates the professional obligations and duties of dealing with this situation in oneself and others…

413 Full Description and Readings

414 A Psychodynamic Perspective of Psychosomatics

This 2 seminar introductory course addresses the evolution of psychosomatics from a dual perspective. Initially a conflict model was elaborated by Freud, and subsequently others, including Groddeck, Ferenczi, and Klein. This assumes symbolized communication becoming manifested physically. Freud also elaborated a nonconflictual deficit model of somatic expression, which was further elaborated by Alexander, Engel, McDougall and the French Psychosomatic School…

414 Full Description and Readings

415 Integrating Psychotherapy and Medication Treatments

This is a practical, clinically oriented seminar designed for psychiatrists, psychologists, and psychotherapists in active practice who deal with the problems of integrating psychotherapy and medication treatments. Participants will examine the history of integration and some significant turning points in thinking about them. Participants will examine current models of treatment and examine their applicability to their own practice…

415 Full Description and Readings

416 Psychoanalysis and Culture

This four seminar course is designed to increase the candidates’ awareness of cultural factors that significantly affect their work when providing therapy for patients who come from different cultural backgrounds. The course draws the candidates’ attention to the fact that there can be dynamics of power differential and deeper biases, both within the therapist and the patient. These can be overt or covert. Thus it is of vital importance for the therapist to be aware of one’s own reactions and values…

416 Full Description and Readings

417 Elective

For these five seminars, the class will have the opportunity to decide on a topic and teachers. The class will hold discussions among themselves, and consult with the fourth year coordinator and the curriculum committee chair, to decide on seminars that will deepen their theoretical understanding and their practice of psychoanalysis. They will select teachers and contact the teachers to make arrangements…

417 Full Description and Readings

 

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